In memoriam of Jeff Storck

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In memoriam of Jeff Storck

Andy LoPresto
It is with a heavy heart that I write to the NiFi community today. Jeff Storck, a PMC member, committer, and genuine and helpful presence in the community, has passed away. 

I was lucky enough to know Jeff personally for many years, and his absence is a huge loss to all of us who did. Jeff was incredibly intelligent, but also kind and willing to share his experience with everyone. Whether playing volleyball (I am nowhere near as good but he humored me), discussing the best ramen and sushi spots, or evaluating a new exercise regime, Jeff brought passion to everything. A number of us are sharing stories of our favorite times with Jeff, and I am touched by how many people have a memory of Jeff reaching out and patiently helping them when they were new or struggling with a task. 

While other colleagues would happily transition to any topic _but_ work when we went to a nearby brewery at the end of a long day, Jeff would sit down next to me and say with a smile, "Ok Andy, work's done, now we can _really_ talk about Groovy unit testing." He never shied away from expressing his perspective and stood on conviction, but he was also open and genuinely wanted to hear other views to expand his mind. 

If you come across a Spock test in the NiFi codebase, that was most likely Jeff's work. He was intimately involved in much of the most challenging code - especially Kerberos integration, making the difficult but critical processes easier for our users. Anyone running NiFi on Java 11 should thank Jeff, as that was a labor of love, pushing against the headwinds of so many compatibility issues and language changes. The ease with which NiFi runs on multiple versions and platforms belies the immense amount of effort and dedication that he put into making this happen. 

There are so many aspects to Jeff that a note like this could never capture, but one that stands above the rest to me is Jeff's passion for learning and growth. He devoted himself to doing the best he could and constantly improving that. That is a noble philosophy that I know I will remember and admire moving forward. I’ve already started learning Kotlin because of Jeff’s enthusiasm and encouragement.

Jeff’s family has created a GoFundMe page [1] and there they describe their intent to celebrate his life. I think that message is very positive and uplifting. To anyone wondering how they can honor Jeff's legacy, I suggest offering a helping hand to someone who needs it. Something as simple as responding to an extra "newbie" mailing list question at the end of a long day, or taking on a challenging task because your neighbor has their plate full. That's how Jeff lived, and he made the world a better place. 


Andy


Andy LoPresto
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PGP Fingerprint: 70EC B3E5 98A6 5A3F D3C4  BACE 3C6E F65B 2F7D EF69

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Re: In memoriam of Jeff Storck

Joe Witt
You will be greatly missed.  Your impact to this community has been tremendous.  The items Andy summarizes were huge efforts that you drove over periods of many many months if not a year or more and they make NiFi so much more accessible than before.

RIP Jeff.



On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 11:24 AM Andy LoPresto <[hidden email]> wrote:
It is with a heavy heart that I write to the NiFi community today. Jeff Storck, a PMC member, committer, and genuine and helpful presence in the community, has passed away. 

I was lucky enough to know Jeff personally for many years, and his absence is a huge loss to all of us who did. Jeff was incredibly intelligent, but also kind and willing to share his experience with everyone. Whether playing volleyball (I am nowhere near as good but he humored me), discussing the best ramen and sushi spots, or evaluating a new exercise regime, Jeff brought passion to everything. A number of us are sharing stories of our favorite times with Jeff, and I am touched by how many people have a memory of Jeff reaching out and patiently helping them when they were new or struggling with a task. 

While other colleagues would happily transition to any topic _but_ work when we went to a nearby brewery at the end of a long day, Jeff would sit down next to me and say with a smile, "Ok Andy, work's done, now we can _really_ talk about Groovy unit testing." He never shied away from expressing his perspective and stood on conviction, but he was also open and genuinely wanted to hear other views to expand his mind. 

If you come across a Spock test in the NiFi codebase, that was most likely Jeff's work. He was intimately involved in much of the most challenging code - especially Kerberos integration, making the difficult but critical processes easier for our users. Anyone running NiFi on Java 11 should thank Jeff, as that was a labor of love, pushing against the headwinds of so many compatibility issues and language changes. The ease with which NiFi runs on multiple versions and platforms belies the immense amount of effort and dedication that he put into making this happen. 

There are so many aspects to Jeff that a note like this could never capture, but one that stands above the rest to me is Jeff's passion for learning and growth. He devoted himself to doing the best he could and constantly improving that. That is a noble philosophy that I know I will remember and admire moving forward. I’ve already started learning Kotlin because of Jeff’s enthusiasm and encouragement.

Jeff’s family has created a GoFundMe page [1] and there they describe their intent to celebrate his life. I think that message is very positive and uplifting. To anyone wondering how they can honor Jeff's legacy, I suggest offering a helping hand to someone who needs it. Something as simple as responding to an extra "newbie" mailing list question at the end of a long day, or taking on a challenging task because your neighbor has their plate full. That's how Jeff lived, and he made the world a better place. 


Andy


Andy LoPresto
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PGP Fingerprint: 70EC B3E5 98A6 5A3F D3C4  BACE 3C6E F65B 2F7D EF69

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Re: In memoriam of Jeff Storck

Jeremy Dyer
This is shocking and heartbreaking news. Jeff was a great guy and will be deeply missed. 

The last time I saw Jeff in person was with Aldrin. We were eating at Bonchon chicken and he was mocking me for how little spice I could handle XD. I could always count on him for a good Dumb and Dumber reference and laugh. We also shared a common hatred for conference food.

RIP Jeff

On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 2:33 PM Joe Witt <[hidden email]> wrote:
You will be greatly missed.  Your impact to this community has been tremendous.  The items Andy summarizes were huge efforts that you drove over periods of many many months if not a year or more and they make NiFi so much more accessible than before.

RIP Jeff.



On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 11:24 AM Andy LoPresto <[hidden email]> wrote:
It is with a heavy heart that I write to the NiFi community today. Jeff Storck, a PMC member, committer, and genuine and helpful presence in the community, has passed away. 

I was lucky enough to know Jeff personally for many years, and his absence is a huge loss to all of us who did. Jeff was incredibly intelligent, but also kind and willing to share his experience with everyone. Whether playing volleyball (I am nowhere near as good but he humored me), discussing the best ramen and sushi spots, or evaluating a new exercise regime, Jeff brought passion to everything. A number of us are sharing stories of our favorite times with Jeff, and I am touched by how many people have a memory of Jeff reaching out and patiently helping them when they were new or struggling with a task. 

While other colleagues would happily transition to any topic _but_ work when we went to a nearby brewery at the end of a long day, Jeff would sit down next to me and say with a smile, "Ok Andy, work's done, now we can _really_ talk about Groovy unit testing." He never shied away from expressing his perspective and stood on conviction, but he was also open and genuinely wanted to hear other views to expand his mind. 

If you come across a Spock test in the NiFi codebase, that was most likely Jeff's work. He was intimately involved in much of the most challenging code - especially Kerberos integration, making the difficult but critical processes easier for our users. Anyone running NiFi on Java 11 should thank Jeff, as that was a labor of love, pushing against the headwinds of so many compatibility issues and language changes. The ease with which NiFi runs on multiple versions and platforms belies the immense amount of effort and dedication that he put into making this happen. 

There are so many aspects to Jeff that a note like this could never capture, but one that stands above the rest to me is Jeff's passion for learning and growth. He devoted himself to doing the best he could and constantly improving that. That is a noble philosophy that I know I will remember and admire moving forward. I’ve already started learning Kotlin because of Jeff’s enthusiasm and encouragement.

Jeff’s family has created a GoFundMe page [1] and there they describe their intent to celebrate his life. I think that message is very positive and uplifting. To anyone wondering how they can honor Jeff's legacy, I suggest offering a helping hand to someone who needs it. Something as simple as responding to an extra "newbie" mailing list question at the end of a long day, or taking on a challenging task because your neighbor has their plate full. That's how Jeff lived, and he made the world a better place. 


Andy


Andy LoPresto
He/Him
PGP Fingerprint: 70EC B3E5 98A6 5A3F D3C4  BACE 3C6E F65B 2F7D EF69

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Re: In memoriam of Jeff Storck

Pierre Villard
I can't say how much we will miss you Jeff. You were a great guy, always nice and helpful with everyone. You always went the extra mile to make things easier and more robust.

RIP Jeff

Le lun. 15 juin 2020 à 21:13, Jeremy Dyer <[hidden email]> a écrit :
This is shocking and heartbreaking news. Jeff was a great guy and will be deeply missed. 

The last time I saw Jeff in person was with Aldrin. We were eating at Bonchon chicken and he was mocking me for how little spice I could handle XD. I could always count on him for a good Dumb and Dumber reference and laugh. We also shared a common hatred for conference food.

RIP Jeff

On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 2:33 PM Joe Witt <[hidden email]> wrote:
You will be greatly missed.  Your impact to this community has been tremendous.  The items Andy summarizes were huge efforts that you drove over periods of many many months if not a year or more and they make NiFi so much more accessible than before.

RIP Jeff.



On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 11:24 AM Andy LoPresto <[hidden email]> wrote:
It is with a heavy heart that I write to the NiFi community today. Jeff Storck, a PMC member, committer, and genuine and helpful presence in the community, has passed away. 

I was lucky enough to know Jeff personally for many years, and his absence is a huge loss to all of us who did. Jeff was incredibly intelligent, but also kind and willing to share his experience with everyone. Whether playing volleyball (I am nowhere near as good but he humored me), discussing the best ramen and sushi spots, or evaluating a new exercise regime, Jeff brought passion to everything. A number of us are sharing stories of our favorite times with Jeff, and I am touched by how many people have a memory of Jeff reaching out and patiently helping them when they were new or struggling with a task. 

While other colleagues would happily transition to any topic _but_ work when we went to a nearby brewery at the end of a long day, Jeff would sit down next to me and say with a smile, "Ok Andy, work's done, now we can _really_ talk about Groovy unit testing." He never shied away from expressing his perspective and stood on conviction, but he was also open and genuinely wanted to hear other views to expand his mind. 

If you come across a Spock test in the NiFi codebase, that was most likely Jeff's work. He was intimately involved in much of the most challenging code - especially Kerberos integration, making the difficult but critical processes easier for our users. Anyone running NiFi on Java 11 should thank Jeff, as that was a labor of love, pushing against the headwinds of so many compatibility issues and language changes. The ease with which NiFi runs on multiple versions and platforms belies the immense amount of effort and dedication that he put into making this happen. 

There are so many aspects to Jeff that a note like this could never capture, but one that stands above the rest to me is Jeff's passion for learning and growth. He devoted himself to doing the best he could and constantly improving that. That is a noble philosophy that I know I will remember and admire moving forward. I’ve already started learning Kotlin because of Jeff’s enthusiasm and encouragement.

Jeff’s family has created a GoFundMe page [1] and there they describe their intent to celebrate his life. I think that message is very positive and uplifting. To anyone wondering how they can honor Jeff's legacy, I suggest offering a helping hand to someone who needs it. Something as simple as responding to an extra "newbie" mailing list question at the end of a long day, or taking on a challenging task because your neighbor has their plate full. That's how Jeff lived, and he made the world a better place. 


Andy


Andy LoPresto
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PGP Fingerprint: 70EC B3E5 98A6 5A3F D3C4  BACE 3C6E F65B 2F7D EF69

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Re: In memoriam of Jeff Storck

Andy LoPresto
In reply to this post by Jeremy Dyer
Jeff loved mocks, both friendly impressions and in his tests. 

Andy LoPresto
[hidden email]
[hidden email]
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PGP Fingerprint: 70EC B3E5 98A6 5A3F D3C4  BACE 3C6E F65B 2F7D EF69

On Jun 15, 2020, at 12:12 PM, Jeremy Dyer <[hidden email]> wrote:

This is shocking and heartbreaking news. Jeff was a great guy and will be deeply missed. 

The last time I saw Jeff in person was with Aldrin. We were eating at Bonchon chicken and he was mocking me for how little spice I could handle XD. I could always count on him for a good Dumb and Dumber reference and laugh. We also shared a common hatred for conference food.

RIP Jeff

On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 2:33 PM Joe Witt <[hidden email]> wrote:
You will be greatly missed.  Your impact to this community has been tremendous.  The items Andy summarizes were huge efforts that you drove over periods of many many months if not a year or more and they make NiFi so much more accessible than before.

RIP Jeff.



On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 11:24 AM Andy LoPresto <[hidden email]> wrote:
It is with a heavy heart that I write to the NiFi community today. Jeff Storck, a PMC member, committer, and genuine and helpful presence in the community, has passed away. 

I was lucky enough to know Jeff personally for many years, and his absence is a huge loss to all of us who did. Jeff was incredibly intelligent, but also kind and willing to share his experience with everyone. Whether playing volleyball (I am nowhere near as good but he humored me), discussing the best ramen and sushi spots, or evaluating a new exercise regime, Jeff brought passion to everything. A number of us are sharing stories of our favorite times with Jeff, and I am touched by how many people have a memory of Jeff reaching out and patiently helping them when they were new or struggling with a task. 

While other colleagues would happily transition to any topic _but_ work when we went to a nearby brewery at the end of a long day, Jeff would sit down next to me and say with a smile, "Ok Andy, work's done, now we can _really_ talk about Groovy unit testing." He never shied away from expressing his perspective and stood on conviction, but he was also open and genuinely wanted to hear other views to expand his mind. 

If you come across a Spock test in the NiFi codebase, that was most likely Jeff's work. He was intimately involved in much of the most challenging code - especially Kerberos integration, making the difficult but critical processes easier for our users. Anyone running NiFi on Java 11 should thank Jeff, as that was a labor of love, pushing against the headwinds of so many compatibility issues and language changes. The ease with which NiFi runs on multiple versions and platforms belies the immense amount of effort and dedication that he put into making this happen. 

There are so many aspects to Jeff that a note like this could never capture, but one that stands above the rest to me is Jeff's passion for learning and growth. He devoted himself to doing the best he could and constantly improving that. That is a noble philosophy that I know I will remember and admire moving forward. I’ve already started learning Kotlin because of Jeff’s enthusiasm and encouragement.

Jeff’s family has created a GoFundMe page [1] and there they describe their intent to celebrate his life. I think that message is very positive and uplifting. To anyone wondering how they can honor Jeff's legacy, I suggest offering a helping hand to someone who needs it. Something as simple as responding to an extra "newbie" mailing list question at the end of a long day, or taking on a challenging task because your neighbor has their plate full. That's how Jeff lived, and he made the world a better place. 


Andy


Andy LoPresto
He/Him
PGP Fingerprint: 70EC B3E5 98A6 5A3F D3C4  BACE 3C6E F65B 2F7D EF69


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Re: In memoriam of Jeff Storck

Yolanda Davis
In reply to this post by Jeremy Dyer
I echo everyone in saying I am heartbroken over the loss of Jeff. I'm so happy to have known him.  We had lots of conversations around all things code, food and one of our favorite TV shows "Atlanta".  At times if anyone were listening in they'd hear us go from having a fierce (but friendly) debate to laughing hysterically.  He was (and to me will always be) such a good guy.

Rest in Peace, Jeff

On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 3:13 PM Jeremy Dyer <[hidden email]> wrote:
This is shocking and heartbreaking news. Jeff was a great guy and will be deeply missed. 

The last time I saw Jeff in person was with Aldrin. We were eating at Bonchon chicken and he was mocking me for how little spice I could handle XD. I could always count on him for a good Dumb and Dumber reference and laugh. We also shared a common hatred for conference food.

RIP Jeff

On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 2:33 PM Joe Witt <[hidden email]> wrote:
You will be greatly missed.  Your impact to this community has been tremendous.  The items Andy summarizes were huge efforts that you drove over periods of many many months if not a year or more and they make NiFi so much more accessible than before.

RIP Jeff.



On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 11:24 AM Andy LoPresto <[hidden email]> wrote:
It is with a heavy heart that I write to the NiFi community today. Jeff Storck, a PMC member, committer, and genuine and helpful presence in the community, has passed away. 

I was lucky enough to know Jeff personally for many years, and his absence is a huge loss to all of us who did. Jeff was incredibly intelligent, but also kind and willing to share his experience with everyone. Whether playing volleyball (I am nowhere near as good but he humored me), discussing the best ramen and sushi spots, or evaluating a new exercise regime, Jeff brought passion to everything. A number of us are sharing stories of our favorite times with Jeff, and I am touched by how many people have a memory of Jeff reaching out and patiently helping them when they were new or struggling with a task. 

While other colleagues would happily transition to any topic _but_ work when we went to a nearby brewery at the end of a long day, Jeff would sit down next to me and say with a smile, "Ok Andy, work's done, now we can _really_ talk about Groovy unit testing." He never shied away from expressing his perspective and stood on conviction, but he was also open and genuinely wanted to hear other views to expand his mind. 

If you come across a Spock test in the NiFi codebase, that was most likely Jeff's work. He was intimately involved in much of the most challenging code - especially Kerberos integration, making the difficult but critical processes easier for our users. Anyone running NiFi on Java 11 should thank Jeff, as that was a labor of love, pushing against the headwinds of so many compatibility issues and language changes. The ease with which NiFi runs on multiple versions and platforms belies the immense amount of effort and dedication that he put into making this happen. 

There are so many aspects to Jeff that a note like this could never capture, but one that stands above the rest to me is Jeff's passion for learning and growth. He devoted himself to doing the best he could and constantly improving that. That is a noble philosophy that I know I will remember and admire moving forward. I’ve already started learning Kotlin because of Jeff’s enthusiasm and encouragement.

Jeff’s family has created a GoFundMe page [1] and there they describe their intent to celebrate his life. I think that message is very positive and uplifting. To anyone wondering how they can honor Jeff's legacy, I suggest offering a helping hand to someone who needs it. Something as simple as responding to an extra "newbie" mailing list question at the end of a long day, or taking on a challenging task because your neighbor has their plate full. That's how Jeff lived, and he made the world a better place. 


Andy


Andy LoPresto
He/Him
PGP Fingerprint: 70EC B3E5 98A6 5A3F D3C4  BACE 3C6E F65B 2F7D EF69



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Re: In memoriam of Jeff Storck

Kevin Doran
In reply to this post by Pierre Villard
Jeff, you were a fantastic collaborator and friend. You will be dearly missed. Thank you for all your contributions, and for all you’ve  shown and taught me over the years. You’ve left behind a great legacy that will continue to have a positive impact on the world for years to come, not just your work but your way of working with others, and for that we are all grateful. RIP.

On Jun 15, 2020, at 3:30 PM, Pierre Villard <[hidden email]> wrote:

I can't say how much we will miss you Jeff. You were a great guy, always nice and helpful with everyone. You always went the extra mile to make things easier and more robust.

RIP Jeff

Le lun. 15 juin 2020 à 21:13, Jeremy Dyer <[hidden email]> a écrit :
This is shocking and heartbreaking news. Jeff was a great guy and will be deeply missed. 

The last time I saw Jeff in person was with Aldrin. We were eating at Bonchon chicken and he was mocking me for how little spice I could handle XD. I could always count on him for a good Dumb and Dumber reference and laugh. We also shared a common hatred for conference food.

RIP Jeff

On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 2:33 PM Joe Witt <[hidden email]> wrote:
You will be greatly missed.  Your impact to this community has been tremendous.  The items Andy summarizes were huge efforts that you drove over periods of many many months if not a year or more and they make NiFi so much more accessible than before.

RIP Jeff.



On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 11:24 AM Andy LoPresto <[hidden email]> wrote:
It is with a heavy heart that I write to the NiFi community today. Jeff Storck, a PMC member, committer, and genuine and helpful presence in the community, has passed away. 

I was lucky enough to know Jeff personally for many years, and his absence is a huge loss to all of us who did. Jeff was incredibly intelligent, but also kind and willing to share his experience with everyone. Whether playing volleyball (I am nowhere near as good but he humored me), discussing the best ramen and sushi spots, or evaluating a new exercise regime, Jeff brought passion to everything. A number of us are sharing stories of our favorite times with Jeff, and I am touched by how many people have a memory of Jeff reaching out and patiently helping them when they were new or struggling with a task. 

While other colleagues would happily transition to any topic _but_ work when we went to a nearby brewery at the end of a long day, Jeff would sit down next to me and say with a smile, "Ok Andy, work's done, now we can _really_ talk about Groovy unit testing." He never shied away from expressing his perspective and stood on conviction, but he was also open and genuinely wanted to hear other views to expand his mind. 

If you come across a Spock test in the NiFi codebase, that was most likely Jeff's work. He was intimately involved in much of the most challenging code - especially Kerberos integration, making the difficult but critical processes easier for our users. Anyone running NiFi on Java 11 should thank Jeff, as that was a labor of love, pushing against the headwinds of so many compatibility issues and language changes. The ease with which NiFi runs on multiple versions and platforms belies the immense amount of effort and dedication that he put into making this happen. 

There are so many aspects to Jeff that a note like this could never capture, but one that stands above the rest to me is Jeff's passion for learning and growth. He devoted himself to doing the best he could and constantly improving that. That is a noble philosophy that I know I will remember and admire moving forward. I’ve already started learning Kotlin because of Jeff’s enthusiasm and encouragement.

Jeff’s family has created a GoFundMe page [1] and there they describe their intent to celebrate his life. I think that message is very positive and uplifting. To anyone wondering how they can honor Jeff's legacy, I suggest offering a helping hand to someone who needs it. Something as simple as responding to an extra "newbie" mailing list question at the end of a long day, or taking on a challenging task because your neighbor has their plate full. That's how Jeff lived, and he made the world a better place. 


Andy


Andy LoPresto
He/Him
PGP Fingerprint: 70EC B3E5 98A6 5A3F D3C4  BACE 3C6E F65B 2F7D EF69


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Re: In memoriam of Jeff Storck

Vijay Chhipa
I waited on pins and needles for the Java 11 support to come out. 
Little did I know that Jeff was the man behind it. 

Thanks for all of your efforts Jeff, because of you we were able to meet critical deadlines. 
RIP Jeff. 

Vijay


On Jun 16, 2020, at 10:03 AM, Kevin Doran <[hidden email]> wrote:

Jeff, you were a fantastic collaborator and friend. You will be dearly missed. Thank you for all your contributions, and for all you’ve  shown and taught me over the years. You’ve left behind a great legacy that will continue to have a positive impact on the world for years to come, not just your work but your way of working with others, and for that we are all grateful. RIP.

On Jun 15, 2020, at 3:30 PM, Pierre Villard <[hidden email]> wrote:

I can't say how much we will miss you Jeff. You were a great guy, always nice and helpful with everyone. You always went the extra mile to make things easier and more robust.

RIP Jeff

Le lun. 15 juin 2020 à 21:13, Jeremy Dyer <[hidden email]> a écrit :
This is shocking and heartbreaking news. Jeff was a great guy and will be deeply missed. 

The last time I saw Jeff in person was with Aldrin. We were eating at Bonchon chicken and he was mocking me for how little spice I could handle XD. I could always count on him for a good Dumb and Dumber reference and laugh. We also shared a common hatred for conference food.

RIP Jeff

On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 2:33 PM Joe Witt <[hidden email]> wrote:
You will be greatly missed.  Your impact to this community has been tremendous.  The items Andy summarizes were huge efforts that you drove over periods of many many months if not a year or more and they make NiFi so much more accessible than before.

RIP Jeff.



On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 11:24 AM Andy LoPresto <[hidden email]> wrote:
It is with a heavy heart that I write to the NiFi community today. Jeff Storck, a PMC member, committer, and genuine and helpful presence in the community, has passed away. 

I was lucky enough to know Jeff personally for many years, and his absence is a huge loss to all of us who did. Jeff was incredibly intelligent, but also kind and willing to share his experience with everyone. Whether playing volleyball (I am nowhere near as good but he humored me), discussing the best ramen and sushi spots, or evaluating a new exercise regime, Jeff brought passion to everything. A number of us are sharing stories of our favorite times with Jeff, and I am touched by how many people have a memory of Jeff reaching out and patiently helping them when they were new or struggling with a task. 

While other colleagues would happily transition to any topic _but_ work when we went to a nearby brewery at the end of a long day, Jeff would sit down next to me and say with a smile, "Ok Andy, work's done, now we can _really_ talk about Groovy unit testing." He never shied away from expressing his perspective and stood on conviction, but he was also open and genuinely wanted to hear other views to expand his mind. 

If you come across a Spock test in the NiFi codebase, that was most likely Jeff's work. He was intimately involved in much of the most challenging code - especially Kerberos integration, making the difficult but critical processes easier for our users. Anyone running NiFi on Java 11 should thank Jeff, as that was a labor of love, pushing against the headwinds of so many compatibility issues and language changes. The ease with which NiFi runs on multiple versions and platforms belies the immense amount of effort and dedication that he put into making this happen. 

There are so many aspects to Jeff that a note like this could never capture, but one that stands above the rest to me is Jeff's passion for learning and growth. He devoted himself to doing the best he could and constantly improving that. That is a noble philosophy that I know I will remember and admire moving forward. I’ve already started learning Kotlin because of Jeff’s enthusiasm and encouragement.

Jeff’s family has created a GoFundMe page [1] and there they describe their intent to celebrate his life. I think that message is very positive and uplifting. To anyone wondering how they can honor Jeff's legacy, I suggest offering a helping hand to someone who needs it. Something as simple as responding to an extra "newbie" mailing list question at the end of a long day, or taking on a challenging task because your neighbor has their plate full. That's how Jeff lived, and he made the world a better place. 


Andy


Andy LoPresto
He/Him
PGP Fingerprint: 70EC B3E5 98A6 5A3F D3C4  BACE 3C6E F65B 2F7D EF69




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